Magical mulch

I’ve never been one for mulching. This year, however, and quite by accident, I have discovered its virtues. I think I’m a convert.

It was all to do with the neighbourhood cats. They were making free in the raised beds as the crops were removed or died back, using the friable and somewhat dry soil as a local, er, convenience. I decided something had to be done.

First step was to cover RB2 with netting. But this had to be at a low level, with gaps to give the tomato plants some freedom.

RB2 with netting 6.17

It didn’t work: A cat got in and panicked under the netting as my husband approached. Not a good experience for either of them.

So, as we were going away for a long weekend, I needed to improvise fast. I chucked onto two beds a lot of the clippings and trimmings I had piled between the beds to dry prior to composting.

This made an untidy sort of thatch over the soil, to some extent battened down with pieces of wood or pruned tree branches. But it had the merit of being quite airy and letting in a fair amount of light, while acting as a cat deterrent.

Now, a week or so later, I’m discovering that mulch has other advantages. I guess all good gardeners know this, but I have rarely given it much thought apart from one experiment with straw many years ago, which didn’t work.

For starters, it is an antidote to cats. It also plays a role in drying out “brown” stuff for the compost. But both of these matters are perhaps beside the point. Mulch certainly helps the soil retain moisture: Even at the end of a fearsomely hot summer’s day, I find some dampness there . It also protects plants, especially seedlings, from the harsh sun and from having their young roots broiled as the water near the surface evaporates.

RB4 mulch and seedlings

So, with some “lift” – i.e. air and light between the stems and leaves – it is both protective and nurturing. It may also protect and nurture snails and slugs, of course, but I keep a sharp eye open for such hooligans sheltering in the raised beds, and this is usually enough.

Reading up about mulches in “Grow Organic“*, it seems I have some way to go to perfect the art. I don’t have enough compost or semi-rotted leaf mould; these are ideal materials because they will add to the organic matter in the soil by safe, natural decomposition. The clippings are probably quite useful since some elements – especially the drying leaves – will eventually be incorporated in the earth below. At the same time, I am not digging in the woody parts so they will not rob the soil of nitrogen as they break down.

Ideally, mulch should be up to 10 or 15 cm deep. I haven’t added this amount, but as I am keen to let seedlings germinate and thrive, this is probably just as well. If you want to use mulch to stop weeds from growing as well as retain moisture in the soil, then you need this kind of depth, perhaps with an under-layer of cardboard or several pages of newspaper.

What I need to do now is to extend the practice, especially to the fruit trees. I keep a circular bed, diameter approx. 60cm, around each one free of weeds. This is good, as far as it goes. But the advice is to mulch well, leaving clear a circle of about 15 cm diameter immediately around the trunk.

So, by sheer chance, my wish to maximise re-using everything we produce in the garden is getting a step closer. Clippings, trimmings, discarded plants – always assuming they are free of disease etc – will from now on have another use in the Jasmine Garden before they get to the compost bin. Wonderful!

Aubergine 6.17* Grow Organic – from Garden Organic, pub. Dorling Kindersley – see http://www.gardenorganic.co.uk

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4 thoughts on “Magical mulch

  1. I’m a big fan of mulch. It really keeps annual seed from germinating and as you say helps stop moisture evaporation; I never have enough but the beds where I use it regularly have noticeably better soil than elsewhere.

  2. Hello Christina – You speak with the voice of experience and, given the weather conditions in which you are gardening, no doubt mulch is a real benefit. I’ll be working with it on all the beds from now on – and look forward to seeing our soil improve, as yours has. One way to increase the quantity available may be to have a container separate from the compost bins for leaf mould only – I read that this is an excellent mulch but it needs to be semi-rotted before being applied.

  3. Hi Christina, I have been mulching for many years and I agree with your blog. However, I think you could make an improvement to your technique if you shredded the material before mulching. Some of the photos the mulch looks very woody. Get a shredder that chops the material into say half inch pieces and it will decompose into the soil faster and look tidier when you spread it.

  4. Hi Steve – Sylvia here. You are absolutely right about the shredding, but what you see in the photos is just a temporary measure to keep cats off in the first instance. It’s not really intended to be decomposable into the soil. We’ve been discussing the need to buy a shredder for some time – trouble is, we have no idea where to get one in Cairo. I think it necessitates a visit to one of the markets where “everything under the sun” is sold, somewhere downtown in the old areas of the city. Will keep you posted!

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